Profile

Marianne Kalinke
Marianne Kalinke
Scholar of Germanic Literature

Marianne Kalinke is an international authority on cultural and literary relations between Scandinavia and the European continent in the medieval and early modern period. In her books and articles she has addressed the transmission of continental literature to Scandinavia, the nature of translation in the Middle Ages, and the impact of medieval French romance on the development of Old Icelandic literature. Her groundbreaking study of the transmission of the Arthurian legend to Norway and Iceland, King Arthur, North-by-Northwest (1981), led to a reconsideration of the impact of continental romance on the development of indigenous Icelandic saga genres. Subsequently, Bridal-Quest Romance in Medieval Iceland (1990), which dealt with the introduction and development of new types of fiction in Iceland, initiated a revision of the received classification of Icelandic literary genres. With The Book of Reykjahólar: The Last of the Great Medieval Legendaries (1996) her study of romance broadened to include sacred romance and the role played by Iceland in preserving medieval German literature that has otherwise been lost. The rise of vernacular fiction in the medieval German-language area from Latin historiographical and hagiographical models are traced in her most recent book, St. Oswald of Northumbria: Continental Metamorphoses (2005).